Word of the Week: SharePoint Online

Word of the Week: SharePoint Online

File sharing in Office 365 (Microsoft Office) for small business and enterprise users is available using the SharePoint Online environment. The SharePoint Online external sharing capabilities enables an organization to share documents with vendors, business partners or customers. Your company can view, share, and collaborate on your SharePoint Online sites as external viewers.

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Word of the Week: SLA

Word of the Week: SLA

Abbreviated SLA, a contract between an ASP and the end user which stipulates and commits the ASP to a required level of service. An SLA should contain a specified level of service, support options, enforcement or penalty provisions for services not provided, a guaranteed level of system performance as relates to downtime or uptime, a specified level of customer support and what software or hardware will be provided and for what fee.

Definition from: Webopedia

Word of the Week: Cloud Computing

Word of the Week: Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is a type of computing that relies on sharing computing resources rather than having local servers or personal devices to handle applications. Cloud computing is comparable to grid computing, a type of computing where unused processing cycles of all computers in a network are harnesses to solve problems too intensive for any stand-alone machine.

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Word of the Day: CIFS

Stands for “Common Internet File System.” CIFS is a standard file system designed for sharing files over the Internet. It is part of the SMB protocol, which allows multiple types of computers to share data and peripherals over a network. CIFS enables users to access files remotely from multiple platforms, including Windows, Mac, Linux, and others.

Each operating system has its own file system, which defines how files and folders are organized. For example, most Windows computers use NTFS, while Macs user HFS. Proprietary file systems are fine when accessing files locally (from the computer itself), but it can cause compatibility issues when users try to access files from a remote system. If the remote device does not recognize the file system of the computer, it won’t be able read the files. CIFS solves this problem by serving as a universal file system that is supported by multiple platforms.

The Common Internet File System provides a standard set of commands that computers can use to access a remote system and read and write files remotely. It supports both anonymous file transfers and authenticated access, which can be used to prevent unauthorized access to certain folders and files. CIFS also includes file locking, which prevents multiple users from editing the same file at the same time.

– definition from TechTerms

Word of the Day: AUP

Stands for “Acceptable Use Policy.” An AUP is list of rules you must follow in order to use a website or Internet service. It is similar to a software license agreement (SLA), but is used specifically for Internet services.

Most well-known, high traffic websites include an AUP, which may also be called Terms of Service (TOS) or Terms of Use (TOU). You can often find a link to the to the website’s AUP in the footer of the home page. Many web services, such as cloud applications require you to agree to an AUP in order to use the online service. ISPs often provide an AUP with each account, which states specific guidelines you must follow.

The specifics of an AUP vary depending on the service offered. Even website AUPs may differ greatly based on the purpose of the website and the website’s content. However, most AUPs include a list of general dos and don’ts while using the service, such as the following:

  1. Do not violate any federal or state laws.
  2. Do not violate the rights of others.
  3. Do not distribute viruses or other malware.
  4. Do not try to gain access to an unauthorized area or account.
  5. Respect others’ copyrights and intellectual property.
  6. Familiarize yourself with the usage guidelines and report violations.

An AUP serves as an agreement between the user and the company offering the online service. Some rules are basic netiquette, while others may have legal ramifications. If you fail to comply with a policy in a AUP, the company has the right to suspend or terminate your account or take legal action if necessary. Therefore, it is wise to familiarize yourself with the AUPs of the Internet services you use.

– definition from TechTerms

Word of the Day: Backlink

A backlink is an incoming link from an external website to specific webpage. For example, if you publish a webpage and 20 other websites link to it, your webpage has 20 backlinks. Links to the page from within your own website are not included in the backlink total.

Web developers benefit from backlinks (or “inlinks”) in two different ways — direct traffic and search result placement. As more links to a specific webpage are published on external sites, there is greater potential for traffic to be generated from other websites. This is called direct traffic. By increasing direct traffic, a website can gradually grow its presence on the Web and generate a steady stream of visitors from other websites.

While direct traffic is helpful, most websites generate the majority of their traffic through search engines. Since search engines use backlinks as an important part of the algorithms for search result placement, external links are important for good search ranking. Therefore, generating backlinks has become common practice for search engine optimization, or SEO. The more backlinks a webpage has, the better the chance that the page will rank highly in search results for relevant keywords. If a website has many pages that have backlinks, the overall number of incoming links may help increase the ranking of all pages within the website. While most backlinks point to a website’s home page, incoming links to other pages within the website are beneficial as well.

– definition from TechTerms

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