Word of the Week: Central Processing Unit (CPU)

Word of the Week: Central Processing Unit (CPU)

The central processing unit (CPU) is the unit, which performs most of the processing inside a computer. To control instructions and data flow to and from other parts of the computer, the CPU relies heavily on a chip set, which is a group of microchips located on the motherboard.

The CPU has two typical components:

  • Control Unit: extracts instructions from memory and decodes and executes them.
  • Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU): handles arithmetic and logical operations.

To function properly, the CPU relies on the system clock, memory, secondary storage, and data and address buses.

This term is also known as a central processor, microprocessor or chip.

– definition from Techopedia

Word of the Week: Network Monitoring

Word of the Week: Network Monitoring

Network monitoring is a computer network’s systematic effort to detect slow or failing network components, such as overloaded or crashed/frozen servers, failing routers, failed switches or other problematic devices. In the event of a network failure or similar outage, the network monitoring system alerts the network administrator (NA). Network monitoring is a subset of network management.

Network monitoring is generally carried out through software applications and tools. Network monitoring services are widely used to detect whether a given Web server is functioning and connected properly to networks worldwide. Many servers that perform this function provide a more complete visualization of both the Internet and networks.

– definition from Techopedia

Word of the Week: Network Security

Word of the Week: Network Security

Network security is a specialized field in computer networking that involves securing a computer network infrastructure. Network security is typically handled by a network administrator or system administrator who implements the security policy, network software and hardware needed to protect a network and the resources accessed through the network from unauthorized access and also ensure that employees have adequate access to the network and resources to work.

A network security system typically relies on layers of protection and consists of multiple components including networking monitoring and security software in addition to hardware and appliances. All components work together to increase the overall security of the computer network.

– definition from Webopedia

Word of the Week: Network Switch

Word of the Week: Network Switch

A network switch (also called switching hub, bridging hub, officially MAC bridge) is a computer networking device that connects devices together on a computer network by using packet switching to receive, process, and forward data to the destination device.

A network switch is a multiport network bridge that uses hardware addresses to process and forward data at the data link layer (layer 2) of the OSI model. Some switches can also process data at the network layer (layer 3) by additionally incorporating routing functionality that most commonly uses IP addresses to perform packet forwarding; such switches are commonly known as layer-3 switches or multilayer switches.

– definition from Wikipedia

Word of the Week: SMO – Social Media Optimization

Word of the Week: SMO – Social Media Optimization

Social media optimization (SMO) is the process of increasing the awareness of a product, brand or event by using a number of social media outlets and communities to generate viral publicity.

Social media optimization includes using RSS feeds, social news and bookmarking sites, as well as social media sites and video and blogging sites. SMO is similar to SEO (search engine optimization) in that the goal is to drive traffic to your Web site.

Word of the Week: Clickbait

Word of the Week: Clickbait

Clickbait is a negative term for webpage links that are intended to boost a page’s clickthrough rate, without regard for whether or not the content on the linked page has value for the reader.

In some cases,  clickbait may  encourage a reader to click through based on a provocative or opaque headline that says just enough to encourage a reader to click but not enough to reveal enough of what the reader will click through to. Often these headlines have little to do with the actual content of the page to which the reader is directed.

– definition from TechTarget

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