Word of the Week: Network Switch

Word of the Week: Network Switch

A network switch (also called switching hub, bridging hub, officially MAC bridge) is a computer networking device that connects devices together on a computer network by using packet switching to receive, process, and forward data to the destination device.

A network switch is a multiport network bridge that uses hardware addresses to process and forward data at the data link layer (layer 2) of the OSI model. Some switches can also process data at the network layer (layer 3) by additionally incorporating routing functionality that most commonly uses IP addresses to perform packet forwarding; such switches are commonly known as layer-3 switches or multilayer switches.

– definition from Wikipedia

Word of the Week: SMO – Social Media Optimization

Word of the Week: SMO – Social Media Optimization

Social media optimization (SMO) is the process of increasing the awareness of a product, brand or event by using a number of social media outlets and communities to generate viral publicity.

Social media optimization includes using RSS feeds, social news and bookmarking sites, as well as social media sites and video and blogging sites. SMO is similar to SEO (search engine optimization) in that the goal is to drive traffic to your Web site.

Word of the Week: Clickbait

Word of the Week: Clickbait

Clickbait is a negative term for webpage links that are intended to boost a page’s clickthrough rate, without regard for whether or not the content on the linked page has value for the reader.

In some cases,  clickbait may  encourage a reader to click through based on a provocative or opaque headline that says just enough to encourage a reader to click but not enough to reveal enough of what the reader will click through to. Often these headlines have little to do with the actual content of the page to which the reader is directed.

– definition from TechTarget

Word of the Week: Software as a Service (SaaS)

Word of the Week: Software as a Service (SaaS)

Software as a service (SaaS) is a software distribution model in which a third-party provider hosts applications and makes them available to customers over the Internet. SaaS is one of three main categories of cloud computing, alongside infrastructure as a service (IaaS) and platform as a service (PaaS).

SaaS removes the need for organizations to install and run applications on their own computers or in their own data centers. This eliminates the expense of hardware acquisition, provisioning and maintenance, as well as software licensing, installation and support. Other benefits of the SaaS model include:

Flexible payments: Rather than purchasing software to install, or additional hardware to support it, customers subscribe to a SaaS offering. Generally, they pay for this service on a monthly basis using a pay-as-you-go model. Transitioning costs to a recurring operating expense allows many businesses to exercise better and more predictable budgeting. Users can also terminate SaaS offerings at any time to stop those recurring costs.

Scalable usage: Cloud services like SaaS offer high scalability, which gives customers the option to access more, or fewer, services or features on-demand.

– definition from TechTarget

Word of the Week: Public Cloud

Word of the Week: Public Cloud

A public cloud is one based on the standard cloud computing model, in which a service provider makes resources, such as virtual machines (VMs), applications or storage, available to the general public over the internet. Public cloud services may be free or offered on a pay-per-usage model.

The main benefits of using a public cloud service are:

  • it reduces the need for organizations to invest in and maintain their own on-premises IT resources;
  • it enables scalability to meet workload and user demands; and
  • there are fewer wasted resources because customers only pay for the resources they use

– definition from TechTarget

Page 1 of 5312345...102030...Last »