Word of the Week: Cloud Computing

Word of the Week: Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is a type of computing that relies on sharing computing resources rather than having local servers or personal devices to handle applications. Cloud computing is comparable to grid computing, a type of computing where unused processing cycles of all computers in a network are harnesses to solve problems too intensive for any stand-alone machine.

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Word of the Week: Encryption

Word of the Week: Encryption

Encryption is the process of using an algorithm to transform information to make it unreadable for unauthorized users. This cryptographic method protects sensitive data such as credit card numbers by encoding and transforming information into unreadable cipher text. This encoded data (more…)

Word of the Day: CIFS

Stands for “Common Internet File System.” CIFS is a standard file system designed for sharing files over the Internet. It is part of the SMB protocol, which allows multiple types of computers to share data and peripherals over a network. CIFS enables users to access files remotely from multiple platforms, including Windows, Mac, Linux, and others.

Each operating system has its own file system, which defines how files and folders are organized. For example, most Windows computers use NTFS, while Macs user HFS. Proprietary file systems are fine when accessing files locally (from the computer itself), but it can cause compatibility issues when users try to access files from a remote system. If the remote device does not recognize the file system of the computer, it won’t be able read the files. CIFS solves this problem by serving as a universal file system that is supported by multiple platforms.

The Common Internet File System provides a standard set of commands that computers can use to access a remote system and read and write files remotely. It supports both anonymous file transfers and authenticated access, which can be used to prevent unauthorized access to certain folders and files. CIFS also includes file locking, which prevents multiple users from editing the same file at the same time.

– definition from TechTerms

Word of the Day: Prebinding

Prebinding is an optimization process that allows faster launching of applications in Mac OS X. Often, when a program is opened, it loads data from files called dynamic libraries. These libraries must be located each time a program is run since their memory addresses are usually undefined.

#WOTD (2)

When a program incorporates prebinding, the addresses of the library or libraries referenced by the program are predefined. This saves time by avoiding unnecessary searching each time the program is run. The prebinding process happens during the “Optimizing” stage of the program’s installation. While prebinding make take some time, it is more efficient to do this process once, rather than each time the program is run.

Prebinding is only possible with Mach-O executable programs, since CFM PEF binaries do not support prebinding.

– definition from TechTerms

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